Bolivia

Bolivia is a landlocked country, bordered by Brazil to the north and east, Paraguay and Argentina to the south, Chile to the southwest, and Peru to the west. Prior to Spanish colonization, the Andean region of Bolivia was a part of the Inca Empire, while the northern and eastern lowlands were inhabited by independent tribes. Today its tourism seems to mostly be backpackers making their way to Uyuni in order to get out to the country’s massive salt flats and take forced perspective photos.


HIDDEN VALLEY
A green oasis one comes across when exploring the Bolivian Altiplano, filled with wildlife and a hidden lake.

LA PAZ
Bolivia’s third most-populous city, the seat of the country’s government and the capital of La Paz Department.

LAGUNA COLORADA
A shallow salt lake in the southwest of the altiplano of Bolivia close to the border with Chile.

POTOSÍ
One of the highest cities in the world by elevation and former location of the Spanish colonial mint.

SALT FLATS (SALAR DE UYUNI)
The world’s largest salt flat, formed as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes.

SOL DE MAÑANA
An area characterized by intense volcanic activity and a sulphur springs field full of mud lakes and steam pools with boiling mud.

SUCRE
Sucre, the first capital of Bolivia, was founded by the Spanish in the first half of the 16th century.

SUCRE (CONVENTO DE SAN FELIPE)
An ostentatious expression of the power of the Catholic Church in the flourishing American society.

TRAIN GRAVEYARD
The train lines were built by British engineers who arrived near the end of the 19th century and formed a sizable community in Uyuni.

VALLE DE LUNA (MOON VALLEY)
An area where erosion has worn away the majority of a mountain, composed primarily of clay rather than rock, leaving tall spires.

VALLEY OF ROCKS
A 30 mile (50 km) stretch of large rocks and boulders situated between Salar de Uyuni and Laguna Colorada.

Back to South America


To do something right it must be done twice. The first time instructs the second.
— Simon Bolivar

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